Augmenting Drug Discovery with Computer Science

The short-list for the annual Arthur C. Clarke Award was recently announced and it reminded me of a post we did last fall on augmentation vs. automation. Clarke is a British science fiction writer who is famous for being the co-screenplay writer (with Stanley Kubrick) of the 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey. He is also known for the so-called Clarke’s Laws, which are three ideas intended to guide consideration of future scientific developments.

  1. When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.
  2. The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible.
  3. Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

These laws resonate here at twoXAR where every week we meet with biopharma research executives who tell us — usually right after we say something like, “using our platform you can evaluate tens of thousands of drug candidates and identify their possible MOAs, evaluate chemical similarity, and screen for clinical evidence in minutes” — that’s “impossible” or “magic”!

READ THE FULL POST AT MEDIUM.COM

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>