twoXAR teams up with SoftBank Ventures, Andreessen Horowitz, and OS Fund to identify new treatments for patients

Traditionally, building a portfolio of drug programs requires hundreds of millions of dollars and takes many years in the biopharmaceutical industry. The convergence of available biomedical data, affordable cloud computing, and advances in algorithms is now enabling companies to build these drug portfolios for an order of magnitude less money and in a fraction of the time it traditionally takes. This is precisely what twoXAR is doing. Using our artificial intelligence-driven drug discovery platform, we aim to find new, more effective treatments to benefit patients across therapeutic areas.

Today I am proud to share that we have assembled a group of high-quality global investors who will help us achieve this vision. Our Series A, which is led by SoftBank Ventures…

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twoXAR Announces Business Advisory Board


From Day 1, our vision at twoXAR has been to “improve health through computation”. We’ve taken many steps along this journey, such as collaborations with leading companies like Santen and breaking new ground in the path to more efficacious treatments in liver cancer. As we continue to build momentum and scale our aspirations to help as many patients as possible, we’re increasingly drawing upon the expertise of industry veterans to guide our strategic decision-making.

Given this, I’m pleased to announce the formation of twoXAR’s Business Advisory Board and welcome Judy Lewent, Jonathan MacQuitty, and Howie Rosen as we move forward on our company’s journey. Each of our advisors brings a unique perspective to our business as we continue to launch disease programs in collaboration with biopharmaceutical companies, investors, and drug development teams…

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Positive Preclinical Proof-of-Concept Results For Liver Cancer Candidate, TXR-311

In September 2016, we announced a collaboration with the Asian Liver Center at Stanford University School of Medicine (the Asian Liver Center). The goal of this collaboration was to identify new drug candidates targeting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, the major form of adult liver cancer). Today, we announced a lead candidate, TXR-311, that has shown positive results in cell-based assays. I wanted to share a bit more background on liver cancer and details on why these results are exciting.

HCC is a primary cancer of the liver that tends to occur in patients with… 

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Seeing the power of AI in drug development

Today we announced our collaboration with Santen, a world leader in the development of innovative ophthalmology treatments. Scientists at twoXAR will use our proprietary computational drug discovery platform to discover, screen and prioritize novel drug candidates with potential application in glaucoma. Santen will then develop and commercialize drug candidates arising from the collaboration. This collaboration is an exciting example of how artificial intelligence-driven approaches can move beyond supporting existing hypotheses and lead the discovery of new drugs. Combining twoXAR’s unique capabilities with Santen’s experience in ophthalmic product development and commercialization… 

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Inspiration from the TEDMED Stage

As with many of my fellow Americans, I have been reflecting about events that have been highlighted in 2016 in the media. Racial strife, gun violence and a polarizing political environment were repeated themes throughout the year. Over dinners and social events, the conversations with friends and family have been morose at times, as many are wondering if society is taking a turn for the worse.

I’m here to tell you that isn’t the case — there is a dedicated group of talented individuals working quietly to make the world a better place.

As a recent speaker at TEDMED 2016, I was fortunate enough to meet dozens of these inspiring pioneers and watch them on stage answering a question…

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Mission Possible: Software-driven Drug Discovery

Originally published at Life Science Leader Online.

In the 25-plus years since the modern Internet was launched we have seen virtually every industry evolve by leveraging the connected, global computing infrastructure we can now tap into any time, from anywhere. Today, advanced software programming tools like machine learning, massive data sets and cloud-based compute are making it easier than ever to rapidly launch and globally scale software-driven services without the capital expense that was once required.

The debate about whether or not software will eat drug discovery is not a new one and remains a topic that can raise voices. As a formally educated computer scientist and cofounder of a company focused on software-driven drug discovery, I come to the discussion with my own biases.

There is no shortage of software in today’s biopharma R&D organization. Cloud-based electronic data capture (EDC), laboratory information management systems (LIMS), process automation, and chemical informatics are just a few of the well-established tools that support R&D and have a meaningful impact. While software has become a …

Read the full piece at Life Science Leader Online.

What’s the difference between “software-led” and “using software”?

Ask an automotive engineer to improve passenger safety and they will invent features like seat belts, airbags and anti-lock brakes. Ask a software engineer to improve passenger safety and they will replace the driver with sensors and software.

The power of software-led projects goes beyond…

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A milestone worth celebrating

There have been a series of events that have defined the history of twoXAR. There was the lecture from Prof. Sirota on computational drug discovery that inspired me to invent. There was the encouragement from V. Paul Lee to patent my idea rather than publish an academic paper. There was the realization that Andrew M. Radin shared not only my name, but my passion for biotechnology and entrepreneurship.  There was that key moment while sailing the Charles River in the summer of 2014 when Andrew and I decided to launch this company.

More milestones followed. There was the day we received funds from our very first investor, Haya Al Ghanim. The email that told us we had been accepted to the StartX accelerator program at Stanford University. The phone call with Michigan State University’s Dr. Tim Collier where we learned our technology predicted in silico what he saw in the lab.

All along the way we’ve assembled an amazing team of scientists and engineers who continually push twoXAR’s technology forward, beyond my wildest imagination.

Today, I’m pleased to announce an exciting new milestone that will further shape our future. Andreessen Horowitz has led a $3.5M investment in twoXAR, along with the Stanford-StartX Fund and our visionary group of angel investors.

We will use these funds to grow our team, form new partnerships and further progress our drug candidates through preclinical studies. We are honored and pleased to have Andreessen Horowitz support our efforts. In addition to their investment, the team at Andreessen Horowitz, including our General Partner Vijay Pande, have signed up to help us with everything from recruiting to business development. It gives us great satisfaction to know we have a world-class organization standing behind us.

There are many more milestones, to be revealed on the road ahead. We look forward to sharing with you our success and discoveries along the way.

Balancing Transparency and Protecting IP

The recent Theranos news has brought to mind the difficult balance between full technical transparency and protecting company IP. As co-founder of a company that has developed a technology that we believe will transform the drug discovery industry, I have struggled with how to best support our claims while protecting our trade secrets.

Early in our company history we thought about moving right from our computational drug predictions into animal studies without involving third parties. At the time, it seemed like the right idea. We could move quickly, reduce uncertainties and produce results in an efficient manner. We learned, however, that without anyone to validate our claims, it was difficult to develop the partnerships and raise the capital required to run these experiments.

Given these hurdles, we decided to  pursue a collaboration-based model. Today, we are working with scientists in academic and commercial biopharma labs who can validate our predictions independently without having any knowledge of our predictive algorithms. We do this by making computational predictions that are then compared to physical experiments made by our collaborators in the wet lab. As we continue to show that our computational predictions match the results they are generating independently in the wet lab, we build confidence in our technology while keeping our secret sauce under wraps.

While we feel that we’ve struck an appropriate balance for where we are today, we continue to think through the best ways to provide the right level of transparency for others to evaluate our claims. For us as scientists, it is important to have the feedback and input of the drug development community. We believe that it’s going to take more than just us to bring this new technology to market – we rely on our collaborators and partners to work with us in this regard.

We want to radically change the process of drug discovery, but, at the end of the day, we want to make sure we are able to do it without sacrificing our commitment to safety and efficacy through rigorous scientific validation.