Synergizing against breast cancer

I was about twelve when I found out my grandmother had breast cancer. My parents did a good job of shielding me from the worst of the details, but there is no way to avoid fear that comes from a loved one being diagnosed with cancer. As a kid, there wasn’t much I could do, but my grandmother loves to tell the story of me trying to comfort her by telling her I was going to do research to help cure her cancer. Little did I know at the time that treating cancer is not as simple as taking a pill once a day and that even identifying the right medicine is akin to finding a needle in a haystack.

Over the next seventeen years, as I pursued undergraduate and graduate studies in biology and genetics, I filled in those knowledge gaps, but felt no closer to changing the status quo of breast cancer…

READ THE FULL POST AT MEDIUM.COM

Positive Preclinical Proof-of-Concept Results For Liver Cancer Candidate, TXR-311

In September 2016, we announced a collaboration with the Asian Liver Center at Stanford University School of Medicine (the Asian Liver Center). The goal of this collaboration was to identify new drug candidates targeting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, the major form of adult liver cancer). Today, we announced a lead candidate, TXR-311, that has shown positive results in cell-based assays. I wanted to share a bit more background on liver cancer and details on why these results are exciting.

HCC is a primary cancer of the liver that tends to occur in patients with… 

READ THE FULL POST AT MEDIUM.COM

Seeing the power of AI in drug development

Today we announced our collaboration with Santen, a world leader in the development of innovative ophthalmology treatments. Scientists at twoXAR will use our proprietary computational drug discovery platform to discover, screen and prioritize novel drug candidates with potential application in glaucoma. Santen will then develop and commercialize drug candidates arising from the collaboration. This collaboration is an exciting example of how artificial intelligence-driven approaches can move beyond supporting existing hypotheses and lead the discovery of new drugs. Combining twoXAR’s unique capabilities with Santen’s experience in ophthalmic product development and commercialization… 

READ THE FULL POST AT MEDIUM.COM

The AI 100 & Combining Artificial Intelligence with Human Intelligence in Drug Development

We at twoXAR were very honored to be included this week in The AI 100, CBInsight’s list of top private Artificial Intelligence companies. It’s given me a chance to reflect on how we employ AI relative to others in the industry.

 Our focus is on drug development — and being one of the few biopharma companies to be included in the list, we use AI in a unique way. Where others may be using AI as the sole ingredient…

READ THE FULL POST AT MEDIUM.COM

Augmenting Drug Discovery with Computer Science

The short-list for the annual Arthur C. Clarke Award was recently announced and it reminded me of a post we did last fall on augmentation vs. automation. Clarke is a British science fiction writer who is famous for being the co-screenplay writer (with Stanley Kubrick) of the 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey. He is also known for the so-called Clarke’s Laws, which are three ideas intended to guide consideration of future scientific developments.

  1. When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.
  2. The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible.
  3. Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

These laws resonate here at twoXAR where every week we meet with biopharma research executives who tell us — usually right after we say something like, “using our platform you can evaluate tens of thousands of drug candidates and identify their possible MOAs, evaluate chemical similarity, and screen for clinical evidence in minutes” — that’s “impossible” or “magic”!

READ THE FULL POST AT MEDIUM.COM

Mission Possible: Software-driven Drug Discovery

Originally published at Life Science Leader Online.

In the 25-plus years since the modern Internet was launched we have seen virtually every industry evolve by leveraging the connected, global computing infrastructure we can now tap into any time, from anywhere. Today, advanced software programming tools like machine learning, massive data sets and cloud-based compute are making it easier than ever to rapidly launch and globally scale software-driven services without the capital expense that was once required.

The debate about whether or not software will eat drug discovery is not a new one and remains a topic that can raise voices. As a formally educated computer scientist and cofounder of a company focused on software-driven drug discovery, I come to the discussion with my own biases.

There is no shortage of software in today’s biopharma R&D organization. Cloud-based electronic data capture (EDC), laboratory information management systems (LIMS), process automation, and chemical informatics are just a few of the well-established tools that support R&D and have a meaningful impact. While software has become a …

Read the full piece at Life Science Leader Online.

The Power of “Lookup Biology”

Guest post by Marina Sirota, PhD, twoXAR Advisor and Assistant Professor, UCSF Institute for Computational Health Sciences

Earlier this month, Andrew A. Radin and I had the opportunity to attend acommunity outreach meeting at UC Irvine hosted by the NIH Libraries of Cellular Signatures (LINCS) consortium. It was a great and diverse community gathering of drug discovery researchers from academia, biopharma, startups, consulting companies and government funding agencies. For anyone interested in listening to the talks, some of them have been posted on YouTube.

The focus of day one was…

READ THE FULL POST AT MEDIUM.COM

What’s the difference between “software-led” and “using software”?

Ask an automotive engineer to improve passenger safety and they will invent features like seat belts, airbags and anti-lock brakes. Ask a software engineer to improve passenger safety and they will replace the driver with sensors and software.

The power of software-led projects goes beyond…

 READ THE FULL POST ON MEDIUM.COM.

Let’s Augment, Not Automate

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.”

Science writer and futurist Arthur C. Clarke’s poignant “third law” only becomes more relevant as technological innovation accelerates and disciplines like computer science, data science and life science converge.

As we have been out in the field demonstrating the power of our technology platform to our collaborators, it has been interesting to hear their reactions when we tell them how it can
evaluate tens of thousands of drug candidates and identify their possible MOAs, evaluate chemical similarity, and screen for clinical evidence in minutes. These responses cover the gamut from, “Wow, this is going to revolutionize drug discovery!” to “this is magic, I don’t believe computers can do this…”

However, whether we are talking to the converted or the skeptical, as we get deeper into conversations about how our technology works, we come into agreement that using advanced data science techniques to analyze data about drug candidates is not magic. In fact, we’re doing what scientific researchers have always done – analyze data that arises from experiments. What’s different is that advances in statistical methods, our proprietary algorithms, and secure cloud computing enable us to do this orders of magnitude faster than by hand or with the naked eye.

The speed of our technology combined with the massive quantities of data that it processes, is simply enhancing the work that our collaborators have been doing in the lab for years. We believe that the most interesting and powerful new discoveries will arise at the intersection of open-minded life scientists combining their deep expertise with unbiased software.

Technologies like ours are meant to augment* the work of life scientists and help them accelerate drug discovery and fill clinical pipelines while leading society to a more robust and streamlined scientific process. Although DUMA might sound futuristic, today it is enabling therapeutic researchers to better leverage the value of their data and do it more rapidly than ever before.

Don’t believe the magic? Contact me and we’ll get a trial started to show you the science.

 

*Sidenote: I have been particularly interested in this interaction between humans and machines, which led me to a class at MIT called The [Technological] Singularity and Related Topics. One of those major topics was whether or not machines (including software) will replace aspects of society. One of my professors Erik Brynjolfsson, author of The Second Machine Age: stated that “We are racing with machines – let’s augment, not automate.”And we definitely share that view here at twoXAR.